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dlna [2014/07/19 00:29]
beandog
dlna [2014/08/15 22:04] (current)
beandog
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 ====== DLNA ====== ====== DLNA ======
  
 +  * [[DLNA HTTP Requests]]
   * [[x264]]   * [[x264]]
   * [[Matroska]]   * [[Matroska]]
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   * [[Sony BDP-S5100]]   * [[Sony BDP-S5100]]
   * [[PS3]]   * [[PS3]]
 +  * [[Best Practices]]
  
 ** Note: ** Right now, all of this is specific to my Sony Blu-ray players that have DLNA support. ​ See [[http://​esupport.sony.com/​US/​perl/​support-info.pl?​info_id=959|file formats supported by Sony]]. ** Note: ** Right now, all of this is specific to my Sony Blu-ray players that have DLNA support. ​ See [[http://​esupport.sony.com/​US/​perl/​support-info.pl?​info_id=959|file formats supported by Sony]].
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   * Figure out how resume-playback works -- I'm guessing that the DLNA server makes a request for a starting point   * Figure out how resume-playback works -- I'm guessing that the DLNA server makes a request for a starting point
  
-==== Best Practices: DLNA ==== 
  
-When it comes to encoding video with x264 for embedded devices that do playback (Blu-ray players, Roku, etc.), your **safest bet** is to use little to no advanced H.264 features. ​ The reason being is that you have to assume that the playback software could be dumb as rocks, and throwing some advanced stuff its way may only make playback poor. 
- 
-General testing with various encoding settings is a reasonable approach, but if you want to keep it safe, focus on changing the CRF or constant bitrate, or the preset, and that's it.  That'​ll give you good quality without taking risks for playback. 

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